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Theranos, épilogue de la descente aux enfers d’une étoile filante de la Silicon Valley

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1 — Blood, Fraud and Money Led to Theranos CEO's Fall From Grace
2 — What Elizabeth Holms and Theranos did wrong, according to the SEC
3 — The rise and fall of Theranos and Elizabeth Holmes
4 — Hot Startup Theranos Has Struggled With Its Blood-Test Technology
5 — It’s worth remembering how Theranos first responded to the WSJ’s exposé
6 — If You Watched This Elizabeth Holmes TED Talk From 2014, It Was Clear She Was a Fraud From Day One
7 — The ugly unethical underside of Silicon Valley
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Theranos, épilogue de la descente aux enfers d’une étoile filante de la Silicon Valley

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Par Geraldine Russell - 16 mars 2018 / 07H00 - mis à jour le 16 mars 2018

Chaque vendredi, dans sa revue de presse, Maddyness vous propose une sélection d’articles sur un sujet chaud qui ont retenu l’attention de la rédaction. Cette semaine, la chute de Theranos.

Blood, Fraud and Money Led to Theranos CEO's Fall From Grace

L’actu

Elizabeth Holmes raised hundreds of millions of dollars from investors on the promise that her medical-testing startup Theranos Inc. would change medicine with a single drop of blood. On Wednesday, securities regulators called her a fraud and forced her to give up the company she built. The lawsuit and settlement announced Wednesday by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission detailed how Holmes and her chief deputy lied for years about their technology, snookered the media, and used the publicity to get investors to hand more than $700 million to keep the closely held company afloat. As part of the accord, Holmes will pay a $500,000 fine, surrender 19 million shares and is barred from being an officer or director of a public company for 10 years. Lire la suite sur Bloomberg

 

What Elizabeth Holms and Theranos did wrong, according to the SEC

Les faits

Holmes and Theranos have not denied or admitted to the charges against them. Throughout the course of business, both engaged in a slew of deceitful actions, according to the government’s complaint. Many centered around two relationships Theranos developed with US chains, which are referred to as “Pharmacy A” and “Grocery A” in the document. (Theranos had previously entered into major partnerships with Walgreens Pharmacy and Safeway supermarkets.) Lire la suite sur Quartz

The rise and fall of Theranos and Elizabeth Holmes

La chrono de l’affaire

Elizabeth Holmes, Theranos’ founder and CEO, dropped out of Stanford University to launch the company in 2003 as a cheaper, more efficient alternative to traditional medical tests. It promised patients the ability to test for conditions like cancer and diabetes with just a few drops of blood. But questions swirled over its testing and technology, and on Wednesday the SEC charged Holmes and former president Ramesh Balwani, with « massive fraud » involving more than $700 million. In a settlement with the SEC, Holmes was forced out of her role at the company. The SEC said it would take its case against Balwani to federal court in San Francisco. Here’s a look back at Theranos’ rise and fall. Lire la suite sur CNN

Hot Startup Theranos Has Struggled With Its Blood-Test Technology

L’article par lequel le scandale est arrivé

On Theranos Inc.’s website, company founder Elizabeth Holmes holds up a tiny vial to show how the startup’s “breakthrough advancements have made it possible to quickly process the full range of laboratory tests from a few drops of blood.” Lire la suite sur le Wall Street Journal (abonnés)

Jared: « This is fraud. »

Richard: « Is it? I mean, our platform does exactly what we say it does. It’s not like we’re lying about it like fucking Theranos. »

Silicon Valley, S03E10

It’s worth remembering how Theranos first responded to the WSJ’s exposé

La première réponse de Theranos, en 2015

When the Wall Street Journal‘s John Carreyrou wrote his first story back on October 16, 2015, raising doubts about the blood-testing company’s claims, the reaction was a lot different. The company responded with a lengthy statement denouncing the piece and questioning Carreyrou’s integrity, calling it “factually and scientifically erroneous and grounded in baseless assertions by inexperienced and disgruntled former employees and industry incumbents.” Lire la suite sur Fast Company

If You Watched This Elizabeth Holmes TED Talk From 2014, It Was Clear She Was a Fraud From Day One

« Je vous l’avais bien dit »

I wanted to believe what she was telling me. Way back in 2014, Elizabeth Holmes stepped on stage during a TED talk and began her treatise explaining how personal access to medical information was so important. « We define diagnosis today as the determination of disease by its signs and symptoms, » she said, in what you can only describe as an unusually low voice. « Yet diseases begin so much earlier than when they first appear. » Makes sense so far, right? Next she talked about actionable health information, which is a phrase you might use if you were trying to score investment funds but not necessarily if you were in the medical field or talking to a sixth grade science class. « No one has to say if only I’d known sooner. No one has to say good-bye too soon, » she claimed. We didn’t roll our eyes. Not even once. Lire la suite sur Inc.com

The ugly unethical underside of Silicon Valley

La solution ?

Vinod Khosla did not show up at TechCrunch Disrupt to be harangued by some smartass, know-nothing journalist. The venture capitalist came to talk about disruption and revolutions to an audience of 1,000 potential disrupters and revolutionaries, laptop glow illuminating their faces in a San Francisco warehouse. But of course the journalist had to bring up Hampton Creek, the vegan-food company that had fashioned itself—and more important, valued itself—like a tech company. Khosla, a legend in Silicon Valley, was a Hampton Creek investor, alongside Peter Thiel’s Founders Fund and Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff. Despite media reports of shoddy science at the company on things like shelf-life testing, and an FDA battle over misleading labeling, Khosla declared Hampton Creek was “doing awesome.” “Debatable,” the journalist, TechCrunch’s Jonathan Shieber, needled before beginning his next question. Lire la suite sur Fortune

Par

Geraldine Russell

16 mars 2018 / 07H00
mis à jour le 16 mars 2018
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