Maddyness

Savedroid, la dernière arnaque d’une longue série ?

Comments
Partager :
Up
Partie précédente
1 — Another day, another $50 million ICO exit scam
Partie suivante
Down
Maddyness
Up
Menu
Partie 1
Down
1 — Another day, another $50 million ICO exit scam
2 — Une startup a monté une fausse arnaque de 50 millions de dollars
3 — Savedroid ICO’s exit scam was actually a very dumb PR stunt
4 — Unpacking the 5 Biggest Cryptocurrency Scams
5 — 6 red flags of an ICO scam
6 — Cryptocurrency scams are just straight-up trolling at this point
Technologies

Savedroid, la dernière arnaque d’une longue série ?

Pepper Pepper Pepper
4898 - piping hot  |  
Comments
Par Geraldine Russell - 20 avril 2018 / 07H00

Chaque vendredi, dans sa revue de presse, Maddyness vous propose une sélection d’articles sur un sujet chaud qui ont retenu l’attention de la rédaction. Cette semaine, la startup Savedroid qui a monté une (fausse) arnaque à l'ICO.

Another day, another $50 million ICO exit scam

Les faits

Savedroid, a German company that purportedly raised $50 million in ICO and direct funding, has exited with a bang. The site is currently displaying the above image and the founder — one Dr. Yassin Hankir — has posted a tweet thanking investors and saying “Over and out.” Savedroid was originally supposed to use AI to manage user investments and promised a crypto-backed credit card, a claim that CCN notes is popular with scam ICOs. Lire la suite sur TechCrunch

Une startup a monté une fausse arnaque de 50 millions de dollars

Le fin mot de l’histoire

Finalement, Yassin Hankar, le PDG de Savedroid est revenu pour donner plus de clarifications. Savedroid, contrairement à ce que l’on pensait a monté en toute pièce cette histoire d’arnaque non pas pour rigoler, mais pour sensibiliser les investisseurs et améliorer la confiance accordée au ICO. Le PDG s’est excusé de cette campagne extrême et a exprimé son souhait d’aider les autorités à dresser des régulations susceptibles de rendre l’ICO un mode de financement sûr pour les startups innovantes. Lire la suite sur Developpez.com

« En étudiant de près le marché, nous nous sommes rendu compte que des arnaques existaient du début à la fin des ICO… que les arnaques sont partout »

Yassin Hankir, CEO de Savedroid

A lire aussi

Savedroid ICO’s exit scam was actually a very dumb PR stunt

L’avis

As a result of this ghoulish PR exercise, Savedroid has in fact managed to bring the limelight back to the vital issue — ICOs need to be better regulated, and investors need to be smarter and more cautious about investing in them. Still though, staging a bogus exit scam might not be the smartest way to get this message across. Lire la suite sur The Next Web

Unpacking the 5 Biggest Cryptocurrency Scams

Le rappel

Since Bitcoin’s inception in 2009, people have become increasingly enamoured with the idea of Blockchain technology. Over time, developers and business minds began creating their own solutions with this decentralized ledger technology. This led to the development of Ethereum and other virtual currencies, with the former in part responsible for a boom in initial coin offerings (ICO) in 2017. Given that there are no promises that an ICO will make good on its future plans, investors take a leap of faith when they part ways with their money. This of course has led to a plethora of scams billed as ICOs, which have seen thousands of investors left out of pocket. Lire la suite sur CoinTelegraph

A lire aussi

6 red flags of an ICO scam

L’instant Ghostbusters

With exponential growth in public interest, esoteric terminology and a lax regulatory framework, it is no surprise that some ICOs have been used to fund scams and cheat investors of their money. While nothing can compete with quality due diligence, knowing which red flags to look for in order to steer clear of scams or bad ICOs can be helpful. Lire la suite sur TechCrunch

Cryptocurrency scams are just straight-up trolling at this point

Facebook announced in a blog post Tuesday that it was banning cryptocurrency advertising from the platform entirely. The company said that many ads for cryptocurrency investment opportunities, like initial coin offerings, were “not currently operating in good faith.” Facebook has a point. Take Prodeum for example, a cryptocurrency startup that appeared online Thursday. By Monday, it was gone.

Prodeum’s 12-page white paper outlined plans to build a database of fruits and vegetables on the Ethereum blockchain. That idea might sound strange, but it’s not the first of its kind. Prodeum asked investors to help raise as much as 5,400 ether—roughly $6.5 million—in an ICO. But after collecting what looks like less than the price of two Chipotle burritos, Prodeum disappeared. The company’s sparkly, professional-looking website was replaced with a single, trolling word: penis. Lire la suite sur Wired

Par

Geraldine Russell

20 avril 2018 / 07H00
mis à jour le 19 avril 2018
Nos derniers articles

Business

Menu

Entrepreneurs

Menu

Finance

Menu

Innovation

Menu

Technologies

Menu
MaddyShop
MaddyShop
Agenda
Agenda
MaddyEvent
MaddyEvent
MaddyJobs
MaddyJobs
MaddyStudio
MaddyStudio
S'abonner à notre newsletter
À propos
Mentions Légales
Articles les plus consultés
>
Search
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Search
Nos services
Les catégories
Maddynews
Recevez le résumé de nos articles directement dans votre boîte mail
Hmm... Il y a visiblement eu un soucis :(
Maddyness

Comme vous le savez, Maddyness est à la pointe de l'innovation.
Malheureusement il semble que votre navigateur ne le soit pas encore...

Pour une bonne expérience de navigation
(et être au top de la modernité) pensez à passer sur :
Chrome
Chrome
Safari
Safari
Firefox
Firefox
Edge
Edge